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Tag Archive 'Genealogy Books'

Here are some comments I copied from certain genealogy-related sites, where the blanks refer to genealogy software: “I had my sister-in-law excited about getting ___, but when she discovered that ______ doesn’t interface with NFS (New Family Search) it was a deal breaker. Now I jealously watch her as she easily transfers information to and […]

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On December 6, 2010 Google brought forth its promised trove of books available at their Internet site. What’s a trove? In Google’s case some 3 million books, many of which are free public domain works. I have spent some time wandering about the site and already have found a half dozen books having promise for […]

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Are you spending hours wondering what presents to give for Christmas? Is the recipient too young for this, too old for that ….. and how could you possibly impact his or her future life meaningfully beyond a few hours? Do you have one of the following on your list: A person close to or in […]

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Lately I have gotten several e-mails and a few telephone calls asking how I handle census records and some ancillary questions. Here were my answers. If you have read other blog entries you will know that I assign and file every Source with a sequential number and place them in a legal folder, in sequence. […]

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In an earlier writing entitled “What Becomes A Book” on 14 May 2010 I suggested that after you have created several (as you define) chapters using the PDF format, you should combine the chapters into a book using (1) the expensive Acrobat Pro, or (2) borrowing a copy at Kinkos or a friend’s. But once […]

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Ancestry.com has purchased over time many of the databases associated with genealogy, providing much help to our community. Those new to the hobby often build a database within Ancestry and either leave it there forever or constantly download Gedcoms to use in their software on their PC. If you leave it there, I would question […]

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Several times in this blog I have discussed the need to have and display proof of your research data. ‘To have’ means you have that proof. ‘To display’ it means others can evaluate those proofs and take comfort in the accuracy of your work. The Proof Standard is: •    Conduct reasonably exhaustive search •    Collect […]

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