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Tag Archive 'Family History'

I found an article in the recent winter 2010 Volume 11 issue of the American Ancestors (which until recently was called New England Ancestors). The magazine is published quarterly by the New England Historic and Genealogical Society (NEHGS). The article was by James R. Miller and entitled Philatelic Genealogy Update. The article was a followup […]

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This is a rant, but I assure you not a political rant. It is a rant on wasted effort and money. All genealogists rely heavily on Census records. The Census is federally mandated every ten years. Its data may not be released to the public for 70 years after that. Thus, the 1940 Census should […]

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Gary Minder of Poulsbo, WA  has created and offers for free incredibly useful spreadsheets for some of the most important genealogical data we will find  in our research. He requests a small donation, but the utility far exceeds any cost. His work can be found at http://www.censustools.com/ Gary says: Ever try entering extracted census data […]

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Who Do You Think You Are? begins Friday, March 5, 2010 at 8/7 Central on NBC. Share a heartwarming journey through family history with Sarah Jessica Parker, Emmitt Smith, Lisa Kudrow, Matthew Broderick, Brooke Shields, Susan Sarandon and Spike Lee as they discover the stories of their ancestors. Who Do You Think You Are? also […]

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The following are 10 excellent sites for exploring an African-American heritage: 1. AfriGeneas 2. The USF Africana Heritage Project This all-volunteer research project and Web site sponsored by the Africana Studies department at the University of South Florida works to discover records that document the names of slaves, freedpersons and their descendants, and share them […]

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As one’s research approaches those ancestors living in the 17, 18 and 19th centuries, one faces monetary numbers no longer in use in the United States. In order to create a reasonable description of the lives and times of those ancestors it is often useful to describe their wealth or lack thereof, to envisage what […]

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One can better establish birth dates by knowing when the Census was actually taken. That date is nearly impossible to determine because it is generally not recorded. But one can get closer to the actual birth date by knowing the instructions given to the Enumerators. U.S. Census enumerators were instructed to take down the names […]

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